A refreshingly non-standardized way to meet the standards...

The Global Workshop's assemblies and participatory workshops teach to a number of state educational standards for the sciences and social studies.

Please select your state (more coming soon!): CaliforniaConnecticutFlorida, New JerseyNew York, Oregon, Washington.

Programing also closely aligns with the International Baccalaureate (IB) Middle Years Program Global Contexts and the Diploma Program Individuals and Society curricula. Learn more →


California 

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Connecticut

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Florida

Science

  • Earth Systems and Patterns
    • SC.912.E.7.1: Analyze the movement of matter and energy through the different biogeochemical cycles, including water and carbon.
    • SC.912.E.7.9: Cite evidence that the ocean has had a significant influence on climate change by absorbing, storing, and moving heat, carbon, and water.
  • Interdependence
    • SC.912.L.17.11: Evaluate the costs and benefits of renewable and nonrenewable resources, such as water, energy, fossil fuels, wildlife, and forests.
    • SC.912.L.17.12: Discuss the political, social, and environmental consequences of sustainable use of land.
    • SC.912.L.17.13: Discuss the need for adequate monitoring of environmental parameters when making policy decisions.
    • SC.912.L.17.14: Assess the need for adequate waste management strategies.
    • SC.912.L.17.15: Discuss the effects of technology on environmental quality.
    • SC.912.L.17.16: Discuss the large-scale environmental impacts resulting from human activity, including waste spills, oil spills, runoff, greenhouse gases, ozone depletion, and surface and groundwater pollution.
    • SC.912.L.17.17: Assess the effectiveness of innovative methods of protecting the environment.
    • SC.912.L.17.18: Describe how human population size and resource use relate to environmental quality.
    • SC.912.L.17.19: Describe how different natural resources are produced and how their rates of use and renewal limit availability.
    • SC.912.L.17.2: Explain the general distribution of life in aquatic systems as a function of chemistry, geography, light, depth, salinity, and temperature.
    • SC.912.L.17.20: Predict the impact of individuals on environmental systems and examine how human lifestyles affect sustainability.
    • SC.912.L.17.4: Describe changes in ecosystems resulting from seasonal variations, climate change and succession.
    • SC.912.L.17.8: Recognize the consequences of the losses of biodiversity due to catastrophic events, climate changes, human activity, and the introduction of invasive, non-native species.
  • The Practice of Science
    • SC.912.N.1.7: Recognize the role of creativity in constructing scientific questions, methods and explanations.
    • SC.912.N.1.5: Describe and provide examples of how similar investigations conducted in many parts of the world result in the same outcome.
    • SC.912.N.1.3: Recognize that the strength or usefulness of a scientific claim is evaluated through scientific argumentation, which depends on  critical and logical thinking, and the active consideration of alternative scientific explanations to explain the data presented.
    • SC.912.N.1.2: Describe and explain what characterizes science and its methods.
  • The Characteristics of Scientific Knowledge
    • SC.912.N.2.1: Identify what is science, what clearly is not science, and what superficially resembles science (but fails to meet the criteria for science).
    • SC.912.N.2.2: Identify which questions can be answered through science and which questions are outside the boundaries of scientific investigation, such as questions addressed by other ways of knowing, such as art, philosophy, and religion.
    • SC.912.N.2.4: Explain that scientific knowledge is both durable and robust and open to change. Scientific knowledge can change because it is often examined and re-examined by new investigations and scientific argumentation. Because of these frequent examinations, scientific knowledge becomes stronger, leading to its durability.
    • SC.912.N.2.5: Describe instances in which scientists' varied backgrounds, talents, interests, and goals influence the inferences and thus the explanations that they make about observations of natural phenomena and describe that competing interpretations (explanations) of scientists are a strength of science as they are a source of new, testable ideas that have the potential to add new evidence to support one or another of the explanations.
  • Science and Society
    • SC.912.N.4.1: Explain how scientific knowledge and reasoning provide an empirically-based perspective to inform society's decision making.
    • SC.912.N.4.2: Weigh the merits of alternative strategies for solving a specific societal problem by comparing a number of different costs and benefits, such as human, economic, and environmental.

Social Studies

  • Civics and Government
    • SS.912.C.4: Contemporary Issues in World Affairs
  • Geography
    • SS.912.G.3: Relationships Between the Earth's Ecosystems and the Populations that Dwell Within Them
    • SS.912.G.2: Physical and Cultural Characteristics of Places
    • SS.912.G.5: How human actions can impact the environment
  • Humanities
    • SS.912.H.1: Identify and analyze the historical, social, and cultural contexts of the arts
    • SS.912.H.3: How Transportation, Trade, Communication, Science, and Technology Influence the Progression and Regression of Cultures.
  • Standard SS.912.P.10: Sociocultural Context Domain/Sociocultural Diversity
  • Standard SS.912.S.6: Social Change/Examine the changing nature of society.
  • Standard SS.912.S.5: Social Institutions/Identify the effects of social institutions on individual and group behavior.
  • Standard 7 SS.912.S.7: Analyze a range of social problems in today’s world.

New Jersey

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New York

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Oregon

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Washington

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International Baccalaureate (IB) Middle Years Program and Diploma Program

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